Finding an Advanced System to Design Supercritical CO2 Power Plants

The supercritical CO2 power cycle is one of the most promising power technologies. It is not by chance though, because carbon dioxide (CO2) has a unique combination of attributes, such as a low critical temperature, an environmentally natural origin, a high standard of safety and a low cost. Carbon dioxide is also thoroughly studied, therefore there is sufficient information surrounding it. But on the other hand, the supercritical CO2 cycle has a high energy conversion factor, such as high thermal efficiency.

Computer aided quality systems

Satisfying users in the turbomachinery industry is not only about building excellent equipment. It also involves delivering the right product-related information and documentation.

Ron Carlson

Ron Carlson has over 25 years of rotating equipment experience.  He has specialized in pumps and pumping systems in the petrochemical industry.  He has served on API 685 and 686 and is the leader of the Process Industry Practices Machinery Function Team as well as serving on the Advisory Committee to the International Pump Users Symposium.  He is retired, but enjoys the continued involvement is improving the pumping industry.

Five basic criteria for selection and application of pumps

There are a lot of questions to be answered when choosing a pump. I have found that there are five basic criteria that need to be determined before any selection is done, or application of the same. Some of these will sound obvious, and some of the companies and individuals may say they support all of these criteria. But they take short cuts in making the choice in order to save money.

Leonid Moroz

Leonid Moroz is the Founder & CEO of SoftInWay and has over 30 years experience in turbomachinery designing flow path for gas turbines up to 115MW and steam turbines up to 1000MW. At SoftInWay, he leads the development of AxSTREAM, the “gold standard” software suite for conceptual design and optimization of turbomachinery, and advises the consulting team on turbomachinery design projects.

thermal analysis bearings heat exchangers

 

One of the most important factors that should be considered in the design (and operation) of any turbomachinery is the thermal structure (or the thermal arrangement). Appropriate materials, cooling systems and insulations (or thermal shields) should be selected for turbomachinery based on a proper thermal analysis.

Reducing steam turbine costs while increasing efficiency

For as long as steam turbines have existed, there have been two major trends for drivers in steam turbine development and innovation: achieving higher efficiency and ensuring longer life span and reliability. In the recent decades, several additional drivers have come into play and have become increasingly important contributors in determining steam turbine and power plant configurations. These factors include climate change concerns, cost pressure and shorter delivery time, which are quite typical manifestations of the intensifying competitive pressure within the industry.

Proper Selection of Turbo-Compressor

1   INTRODUCTION

Evaluation and purchasing of turbo-compressors should involve an optimization process with respect to full array of compressor data. Otherwise, equipment may not be suitable over the full operating cases, in meeting reliability, maintainability, availability, commercial terms or power requirements for which the client expects.

 

2   COUPLING SELECTION

Reaction combustor fuels

The early promise of CFD-based design approaches was that the predictable nature of the calculations would enable studies of multiple gas turbine combustor designs prior to prototyping. As part of the development flow, simulation could predict important system attributes such as stability and emissions performance and reduce the need for costly experimental testing. Results vary widely, however, among organizations.

Industrial Steam Turbine: today and tomorrow

The industrial steam turbine has to change with the times. Competition pushes OEMs to develop new and more efficient turbines. In power generation the picture is more or less clear.  This month Turbomachinery magazine published an article that said that Seimens, GE, Alstom and Mitsubishi have all surpassed the 60% combined cycle efficiency milestone. What then is a realistic target for industrial steam turbines?

And how do we achieve this target for turbines of 5MW, 10MW or 40MW? 

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