Capstone Developments

What the green energy company has been up to

1.6 MW Microturbines

Capstone Green Energy Corporation is sending C1000S and C600S microturbines totaling 1.6 MW to a bottling and packaging solutions provider in Mexico, being installed in a combined heat and power (CHP) application. They are including a 10-year service contract.

The microturbines will be placed at the manufacturer’s Guadalajara facility and should provide around-the-clock electrical power and thermal energy for the plant. The exhaust will be used to feed a hot water exchanger with preheated boilers. According to the company, Capstone CHP systems can reach efficiencies of more than 80%.

600 KW Microturbine

There is an order for a 600 kW microturbine system, going to a renewable natural gas station in Kansas.

Commission will be the end of the month. The new system will provide reliable power for gas compression operations at a remote site where no utility electricity is available. It’s driven by a Capstone C600S configured for dual mode operation, which means it is capable of both grid-connected and standalone operation. It will use the high-pressure natural gas (HPNG) available on-site.

The location is remote and unstaffed, so operational reliability and low maintenance are key. The microturbine has the ability to run on either biogas or renewable natural gas.

EAAS Growth

They have secured a new 12-month Energy-as-a-Service (EaaS) rental contract with a local oil and gas company headquartered in Anchorage, Alaska. The oil exploration company is looking to reduce the environmental effects of their operations.

EaaS growth has reduced CO2 emissions by more than 1,115,100 kilotons (KT) in the past three years. Capstone’s EaaS helps reduce the carbon footprint for onsite energy systems, helping customers reach environmental impact targets.

As part of their growth strategy, Capstone has turned to a “re-rent” strategy which allows the company to push the EaaS rental business model without using large amounts of new capital. A “re-rented” unit is taking an existing unutilized microturbine unit and deploying it into the EaaS customer base. 14 MW of the 35 MW are re-rented.