DOE announces $65 Million in public and private funding for promising energy technologies

The fund will benefit 12 labs across the nation, with many working on projects involving natural gas, turbines, hydrogen, and more.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced over $30 million in federal funding, matched by over $35 million in private sector funds, for 68 projects that will accelerate the commercialization of promising energy technologies. These awards are facilitated by the Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF).

The TCF will be providing revenue to 12 labs across the nation, each working on several projects. Some of these projects can be found below.

Ames Laboratory: $343,500 in federal funds cost-shared by partners in Pennsylvania and New York. One project focuses on developing a new coating for gas turbines.

Idaho National Laboratory: $1,175,000 in federal funds, cost-shared by partners in Arizona and Idaho. One project focuses on hydrogen and chemical co-production via electrochemical activation of propane.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: $2,029,599 in federal funds, cost-shared by partners in Massachusetts, Ohio and Connecticut. One project aims to reduce the water requirement of hydrogen production.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: $3,130,000 in federal funds, cost-shared by partners in California. Projects include carbon capture improvements, a technology to improve the reliability of the metal additive manufacturing process, improvements to Lidar, and converting biogas to sellable products.

Los Alamos National Laboratory—$4,724,659 in federal funds, cost-shared by partners in California, Maryland, and Massachusetts. Projects include a new technology for carbon-carbon composites and innovations in hydrogen production.

National Energy Technology Laboratory—$150,000 in federal funds cost-shared by a partner in Oklahoma. The project focuses on chemical conversions.

National Renewable Energy Laboratory—$5,044,337 in federal funds, cost-shared by partners in California, Florida, New York, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Delaware, Virginia, and North Carolina. Some projects focus on the storing and transport of hydrogen, as well as its use in supporting the grid.